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10 Best Linux Partition Managers for Advanced Users

Linux partition managers are powerful tools that allow users to create, resize, and manage the various partitions on their Linux systems. These partitions are essentially slices of your hard drive that can be used to store different types of data, such as your operating system, documents, media files, and more. With a partition manager, you can easily create new partitions, delete old ones, or resize existing partitions to better suit your needs.

Whether you’re a seasoned Linux user or just starting out, a good partition manager can make it much easier to manage your system and keep it running smoothly. So let’s dive in and explore the world of Linux partition managers!

Best Linux Partition Manager Tools


Are you looking for the best Linux Partition Managers to help you manage your partitions quickly and easily? Look no further – here are 15 of the top Linux Partition Managers that are designed to make partition management a breeze.

Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced user, these powerful tools will help you get the most out of your Linux system. From shrinking, expanding, and deleting partitions to moving data between disks, these partition managers have everything you need! So take a look to find the perfect one for you!

1. Fdisk – (Command Line)


With fdisk, Linux users can easily manipulate their hard drives to create and delete partitions or modify partition table entries. This powerful utility is an excellent tool for experienced system administrators looking to take control of their systems. By using fdisk, you are able to customize your system’s storage capabilities with just a few simple commands – making it easier than ever before!

To use fdisk, you will need to open a terminal and enter the fdisk command followed by the name of the device you want to manage. For example, to manage the first hard drive on your system, you might enter the following command:

fdisk /dev/sda

Once you have entered the fdisk command, you will be presented with a list of options. You can use these options to create, delete, or modify partitions on your hard drive. For example, to create a new partition, you might enter the “n” option and follow the prompts to specify the size and location of the new partition.

fdisk is a powerful yet dangerous tool, as it could accidentally remove or modify your partitions in an irreversible manner and result in data loss. Therefore, be sure to back up any essential information before using fdisk. Moreover, make sure you read the documentation thoroughly and understand how the options work prior to modifying your partitions.

2. GNU Parted – (Command Line)


GNU Parted is a cutting-edge and versatile partition manager capable of working with virtually any file system. Not only does it provide the tools to create, delete, and resize partitions with ease, but it also supports multiple types of filesystems! In short: GNU Parted makes managing your hard drive as easy as 1-2-3.

One of the main advantages of GNU Parted is its flexibility. It is a command-line tool, which means that it can be used from the terminal and is highly configurable. This makes it a good choice for advanced users who want more control over their partitioning operations.

Another advantage of GNU Parted is its wide range of supported file systems. It is able to work with a variety of different file systems, which makes it a good choice for users who need to manage systems with multiple file systems.

Additionally, GNU Parted is free and open-source software, which means that it is available to anyone to use and modify. This makes it a good choice for users who want to take advantage of the latest features and improvements without having to pay for a proprietary partition manager.

Overall, GNU Parted is a powerful and flexible tool that is well-suited for advanced users who need to manage their Linux systems at a low level.

3. Gparted


gparted

GParted is a popular and widely-used partition manager for Linux systems. It has a simple, easy-to-use graphical interface that makes it a great choice for both beginners and advanced users.

GParted is an incredibly powerful tool that allows users to effortlessly create, delete, and resize partitions on their hard drives. It offers flexibility with its range of supported file systems, such as ext2, ext3, fat16, hfs+, jfs, ntfs, and xfs, making it the perfect partition management solution for any user. In addition, GParted also facilitates viewing or modifying existing partition table entries.

Installing GParted on your Linux system is a simple process, as it’s generally available in the default repositories of several popular distributions. All you need to do is access your distribution’s package manager and install GParted from there!

Easily launch GParted either by searching for it in your system’s menu or entering the “gparted” command into a terminal. Then, you can access its user-friendly interface to select which device to manage and take advantage of its range of tools and options. With this program, you have complete control over creating, deleting, or resizing partitions with ease!

4. GNOME Disks


GNOME Disks Utility

GNOME Disks is an intuitive partition manager designed exclusively for Linux systems. Incorporated in most recognized Linux distributions, it is the ideal segmentation tool to be used with the GNOME desktop environment – providing simplicity and convenience!

Installing GNOME Disks on your Linux system is simple. Most of the popular Linux distributions include it in their default repositories, so you can effortlessly install it through your distribution’s package manager.

After Installing GNOME Disks — search for “Disks” in the system menu or type “gnome-disks” into a terminal. Once launched, you can quickly manage your desired device using the user-friendly interface with its many options like creating, deleting, and resizing partitions.

There are several advantages to using GNOME Disks as your partition manager on a Linux system:

  • Easy to use: One of the main advantages of GNOME Disks is its simple and user-friendly interface. It is designed to be easy to understand and navigate, making it a good choice for both beginners and advanced users.
  • Wide range of supported file systems: GNOME Disks supports a wide range of file systems, including ext2, ext3, ext4, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, ntfs, reiserfs, and xfs. This makes it a good choice for users who need to manage systems with multiple file systems.
  • Customizable: GNOME Disks allows users to customize the way it displays information and configure various settings to suit their needs. This makes it a flexible and adaptable tool that can be tailored to the specific needs of each user.
  • Free and open-source: GNOME Disks is free and open-source software, which means that it is available to anyone to use and modify. This makes it a good choice for users who want to take advantage of the latest features and improvements without having to pay for a proprietary partition manager.
  • Widely available: GNOME Disks is included in many popular Linux distributions, making it easy for users to install and use on their systems.

Overall, GNOME Disks is a user-friendly and feature-rich partition manager that is well-suited for a wide range of users and use cases.

5. KDE Partition Manager


KDE Partition Manager

KDE Partition Manager is a graphical partition manager for Linux systems that is designed to be used with the KDE desktop environment. It offers a variety of features and tools for creating, deleting, and resizing partitions on hard drives, as well as viewing and modifying partition table entries.

Some of the features and tools offered by KDE Partition Manager include:

  • Support for a wide range of file systems: KDE Partition Manager supports a wide range of file systems, including ext2/3/4, btrfs, reiserfs, NTFS, FAT16/32, JFS, XFS, and more. This makes it a good choice for users who need to manage systems with multiple file systems.
  • Partition creation and resizing: KDE Partition Manager allows users to create new partitions and resize existing ones to better suit their needs. It provides a variety of options for specifying the size and location of partitions, as well as the file system to be used.
  • Partition deletion: KDE Partition Manager allows users to delete existing partitions if they are no longer needed. This can be useful for freeing up space on a hard drive or reorganizing data.
  • Partition table management: KDE Partition Manager allows users to view and modify partition table entries. This can be useful for correcting errors or adjusting the layout of partitions on a hard drive.
  • Disk analysis and repair: KDE Partition Manager includes tools for analyzing and repairing disk errors, making it a useful tool for maintaining the health of a hard drive.

Installing KDE Partition Manager is quite easy, as it’s typically included in the default repositories of Linux distributions that use the KDE desktop environment. All you need to do is utilize your distribution’s package manager and then search for “KDE Partition Manager” in your system menu or simply enter “partitionmanager” into a terminal. After installation, watch as this powerful program revolutionizes how you manage and organize data on your Linux system!

6. cfdisk – (Command Line)


For users of Linux systems, cfdisk simplifies the daunting task of partitioning hard drives. This user-friendly command-line utility offers a straightforward interface that allows its users to create and delete partitions, as well as modify their existing ones. Furthermore, it is designed for both novice and experienced computer enthusiasts in order to further promote an improved workflow.

With its versatility and accessibility, cfdisk provides an invaluable resource for those wishing to optimize their computers’ performance through better partition management!

To create a new partition using cfdisk, follow these steps:

  • Open a terminal and enter the cfdisk command followed by the name of the device you want to manage. For example, to manage the first hard drive on your system, you might enter the following command:
cfdisk /dev/sda
  • Once cfdisk is open, you will be presented with a list of options. Use the arrow keys to select the “New” option and press Enter.
  • Follow the prompts to specify the size and location of the new partition. You will also be asked to select the type of partition to create. Choose the appropriate option and press Enter.
  • Once you have finished creating the new partition, use the arrow keys to select the “Write” option and press Enter. This will write the changes to the partition table.
  • Finally, use the arrow keys to select the “Quit” option, and press Enter to exit cfdisk.

It is of utmost importance to remember that cfdisk is a powerful utility, and accidental deletion or modification can result in data loss. Thus, it’s always wise to securely back up your critical information before utilizing cfdisk. Moreover, you must also read the documentation thoroughly and comprehend how to utilize its various options before attempting any changes with respect to your partitions.

7. GPT fdisk – (Command Line)


GPT fdisk is a Linux partition manager that provides users with the ability to create and manage GPT (GUID Partition Table) partitions on hard drives. It offers features such as creating hybrid MBR/GPT partitions, identifying partition types and their associated GUID numbers, and so on.

Additionally, it also allows users to delete existing partitions if they are no longer needed in order to free up space or reorganize data. Furthermore, GPT fdisk is easy to install as it’s typically included in the default repositories of Linux distributions that use the KDE desktop environment.

To create a new partition using GPT fdisk, follow these steps:

  • Open a terminal and enter the gdisk command followed by the name of the device you want to manage. For example, to manage the first hard drive on your system, you might enter the following command:
gdisk /dev/sda
  • Once inside GPT fdisk, you will be presented with a list of options. Use the arrow keys to select the “New” option and press Enter.
  • Follow the prompts to specify the size and location of the new partition. You will also be asked to choose a partition type. Choose the appropriate option and press Enter when done.
  • Once you have finished creating the new partition, use the arrow keys to select the “Write” option and press Enter. This will write the changes to the partition table.
  • Finally, use the arrow keys to select the “Quit” option, and press Enter to exit GPT fdisk.

Similar to cfdisk, it is important to remember that GPT fdisk is a powerful Linux partition manager, and accidental deletion or modification can result in data loss. Therefore, you must securely back up your critical information before using GPT fdisk and make sure to read the documentation thoroughly to understand how to use its various features.

8. ntfs-3g


ntfs-3g is a free and open-source software tool that allows Linux systems to read and write to NTFS (New Technology File System) partitions. It is an implementation of the NTFS file system that provides full read and write access to NTFS partitions, allowing users to transfer files between Linux and Windows systems and access files stored on NTFS partitions from within Linux.

Some important features of ntfs-3g include:

  • Full read and write access to NTFS partitions: ntfs-3g allows Linux systems to read and write to NTFS partitions, providing full access to the files and directories stored on these partitions.
  • Compatibility with a wide range of systems: ntfs-3g is compatible with a wide range of Linux systems, including popular distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and CentOS.
  • Support for large files and partitions: ntfs-3g is able to handle large files and partitions, making it a good choice for users who need to transfer or access large files stored on NTFS partitions.
  • Automatic handling of permissions and ownership: ntfs-3g automatically handles the mapping of Linux and Windows permissions and ownership, allowing users to seamlessly access and modify files stored on NTFS partitions.
  • Integration with the Linux file system: ntfs-3g integrates seamlessly with the Linux file system, allowing users to access NTFS partitions as if they were native to the Linux system.

Overall, ntfs-3g is a powerful and flexible tool that is essential for anyone who needs to transfer files between Linux and Windows systems or access files stored on NTFS partitions from within Linux.

9. LVM (Logical Volume Manager)


LVM (Logical Volume Manager) is a tool for managing disk storage on Linux systems. It allows users to create logical volumes, which are virtual partitions that can be created and configured independently of the physical layout of the hard drives on a system.

Some important features of LVM include:

  • Logical volume management: LVM allows users to create, delete, and modify logical volumes, as well as view and modify the logical volume configuration. This can be useful for creating and managing storage spaces that are independent of the physical layout of the hard drives on a system.
  • Support for a wide range of file systems: LVM can be used with a wide range of file systems, including ext2, ext3, ext4, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, ntfs, reiserfs, and xfs. This makes it a good choice for users who need to manage systems with multiple file systems.
  • Resizing and relocation of logical volumes: LVM allows users to resize and relocate logical volumes, making it easy to adjust the storage space on a system to meet changing needs.
  • Snapshots: LVM allows users to create snapshots of logical volumes, which are point-in-time copies of the data stored on the volume. This can be useful for creating backups or for reverting to a previous state if necessary.
  • Striping and mirroring: LVM supports striping and mirroring, which allows users to spread data across multiple physical drives to improve performance or to create redundant copies of data for increased reliability.

Overall, LVM is a powerful and flexible tool that is essential for anyone who needs to manage storage on Linux systems. It can be used to create and configure logical volumes, resize and relocate them, create snapshots, and enable striping and mirroring for improved performance or reliability.

With its wide range of features, LVM is a great choice for Linux system administrators who need to manage disk storage effectively.

10. cgdisk – (Command Line)


cgdisk is a command-line partition manager for Linux systems that allows users to create, delete, and modify partitions on hard drives that use the GUID Partition Table (GPT) format. It is designed to be easy to use and understand, making it a good choice for both beginners and advanced users.

Installing cgdisk on your Linux system is simple. In most cases, it will already be included in the default repositories of popular Linux distributions. All you need to do is use your distribution’s package manager for a quick and easy setup!

To get started with cgdisk, simply enter “cgdisk” in your terminal window. For example, if you want to manage the first hard drive on your system, all you need to do is type this command:

cgdisk /dev/sda

After launching cgdisk, you will be presented with a number of options. Utilize them to create, delete or modify partitions on your hard drive. Let’s say that you want to generate a new partition – enter the “n” choice and follow the instructions given in order to define its size and location accordingly.

FAQ: Linux Partition Manager


Here are some frequently asked questions about Linux partition managers:

Q: What is a partition manager?

A: A partition manager is a tool that allows users to create, delete, and modify partitions on hard drives. Partitions are sections of a hard drive that are treated as separate devices, allowing users to store and organize their data in a way that is logical and easy to manage.

Q: What are some common Linux partition managers?

A: Some common Linux partition managers include fdisk, cfdisk, GPT fdisk, cgdisk, and GNU Parted.

Q: How do I choose the right partition manager for my system?

A: The best partition manager for your system will depend on your specific needs and preferences. Some factors to consider when choosing a partition manager include the type of hard drive you are using (e.g., GPT or MBR), the file systems you need to support, and your level of experience with partition management.

Q: Are partition managers safe to use?

A: Partition managers are powerful tools, and it is possible to accidentally delete or modify partitions in a way that could cause data loss. As such, it is always a good idea to back up your important data before using a partition manager. Additionally, it is a good idea to carefully read the documentation and understand how to use the various options before attempting to make any changes to your partitions.

Finally, Insights!


Linux partition managers are essential tools for anyone who needs to manage the storage space on their Linux system. They allow users to create, delete, and modify partitions in order to better organize their data and allocate storage space to meet their needs.

There are a variety of partition managers available for Linux, each with its own unique features and capabilities. When choosing a partition manager, it is important to consider factors such as the type of hard drive you are using, the file systems you need to support, and your level of experience with partition management.

It is also important to remember to back up your important data before using a partition manager, as it is possible to accidentally delete or modify partitions in a way that could cause data loss. Overall, Linux partition managers are powerful and flexible tools that are essential for managing and organizing the storage space on a Linux system.

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